Introduction

     This site is designed to act as a guide to the complete musical works of the preeminent avant-garde composer Karlheinz Stockhausen. Each chapter (listed in the right column alphabetically, and then chronologically by "Work No.") provides the historical context of a piece, followed by an overview of the composer’s intentions and inventions. This is complemented by a track-by-track “listening guide” to the piece as presented on the Stockhausen Complete Edition CD label (although the guides function for recordings on other labels as well, just not as precisely).  Finally I give my own “sound impressions” of the work, and provide some (hopefully interesting) personal reactions.

     Originally conceived as a "blog project" to document Stockhausen's work catalog, the posts can also be read in the chronological order in which I wrote them (in which case the first chapter would be MIKROPHONIE I). This sequence can be followed by clicking on the "Newer Post" link at the bottom left of each page (the sequence of works to analyze was generally "random", or at least designed for variety).

     UPDATE: The chapters devoted to the analysis of each of Stockhausen's compositions were essentially completed by the end of 2015. Now, in 2018, I've started to add "consumer guides" to the Stockhausen Complete Edition CDs as well. These guides (at this writing still a work in progress) can be accessed by the "folder tabs" near the top of the page. 

     This Stockhausen resource is designed to complement the ample booklets (books) which come with the Stockhausen Edition CDs and scores. Stockhausen was very astute about giving relevant information to a listener first approaching his works. His lectures and interviews are strikingly rich and cogent. However, sometimes when looking from inside the work, it’s possible that a composer might not think to include an explanation of every relevant aspect useful to the intrepid first-time listener. In these chapters, I tried to present each work so that they could be appreciated by the general music listener, even if they were not deeply familiar with Stockhausen’s oeuvre. A working knowledge of musical notation and classical harmony wouldn’t hurt, but even so, musical “laymen” should be able to follow my articles (I personally am only just moderately musically literate).

     At this point it might not be too inappropriate to reminisce about my own introduction to the wondrous world of Stockhausen's “sounds in space”. I was first introduced to Stockhausen's music when I heard his composition for piano, percussion and electronically-produced tape -  KONTAKTE. At this point in my life (early '90s) I was very familiar with all forms of rock, progressive jazz, and free improvisation. Each of these styles was very important to me and played key roles in my own musical projects. However, when I first heard KONTAKTE on the new music program of the local college radio station (WKCR in New York City) I was completely floored at how it seemed to merge the textures, dynamics and spirit of all three forms of what I considered to be the most exciting styles of the day. And, amazingly, it was recorded in the late 1950s! This was, in fact, the recording of KONTAKTE released on Wergo, with pianist David Tudor and percussionist Cristoph Caskel. Even slotted amongst a broadcast program made up of the best “new music” being produced at the time, KONTAKTE virtually exploded out of my stereo speakers in a fanfare of jaw-dropping, head-spinning multi-dimensional sound.

     Not long after this, a program entirely devoted to Stockhausen’s music was aired on the same station. Even now, almost 30 years later I can still recall which pieces were included: TRANS, MANTRA, KONTRA-PUNKTE, GRUPPEN, STERNKLANG, MIKROPHONIE I(full disclosure: I taped part of the program, so I did get to listen to it over and over again for a couple years…). Some pieces grabbed me right away (KONTRA-PUNKTE, especially), and some left me a bit tired (MANTRA), and some left me confused (TRANS), but in any case from that point forward I was a “Stockhausen-freak”. The following months were occupied with trading “rare” Stockhausen LPs with friends and searching bookstores and libraries for Stockhausen-related treasures (one such being the 2nd, expanded edition of Robin Maconie’s “The Works of Karlheinz Stockhausen”, a true predecessor to this site, if anything).






     At one point I read a description of HYMNEN and knew instantly that I had to hear it - of course the Deutsche-Grammophon LP was impossible to come across. I ended up calling up WKCR’s mid-week overnight new music program and requesting that they play all four LP sides. Amazingly, they complied (I expect that they didn’t get more than a half-dozen requests a night anyways, and these fellows were obviously Stockhausen fans). Starting at about 2:30 in the early morning, they started Side A and I stayed up to hear the entire 2 hours (3 hours after that I reported to work!). I lost a night’s sleep but gained a magical (and international) sound-world of kaleidoscopic aural imagery. At some point I also discovered such legendary mind-expanding works such as KURZWELLEN and the pieces making up AUS DEN SIEBEN TAGEN. These too, had a profound impact on my development as a listener, performer and composer.


      On a side note, the text pieces from AUS DEN SIEBEN TAGEN have always had a controversial air about them. In retrospect, these texts and recordings could have a dangerous effect on a young composer/performer's mind - perhaps a kind of music-based “uncontrolled substance”. Because of the poetic, verse-based, open nature of these compositions, it was admittedly very easy to use them to launch in overly-indulgent, sometimes less-than-musically-relevant musical "performances" - Stockhausen himself was always very wary of "dilettantes" in these scenarios. Nonetheless, it was a journey, and we were trying to follow in Stockhausen’s footsteps.

     Most of Stockhausen’s popular works at that time came from the ‘50s and ‘60s, with SIRIUS being a kind of cutoff point. It’s not hard to see why, as the LP cover was a bit "distracting", and the textures produced by the EMS Synthi 100 were then not nearly as rich as the manipulated analog tape loops found in the ‘50s works. Additionally, around this time Stockhausen’s catalog was being bought up by the Stockhausen Verlag, and so CDs of more current works were increasingly hard to come by in local shops. Nonetheless, I was able to withdraw CDs of DONNERSTAG AUS LICHT  and SAMSTAG AUS LICHT (then still distributed by DG) from the NYPL, and these took me farther into Stockhausen’s '70s world, although I really couldn’t follow the German libretto (nor even fully understand the English explanations in the booklet). However, some scenes (notably MICHAELS REISE and KATHINKAS GESANG) became as much of a favorite to me as the earlier WDR-related “noise” pieces.

     My interest in Stockhausen during the following decades can be summarized as periodically-recurring episodes of “Stockhausen-mania”, as I continued in my own musical development as a performer-composer. In the late ‘90s my primary experimental music project Spin-17 (with Motoko Shimizu), recorded a piece dedicated to Stockhausen, “re-interpreting” the “Studio Conversation” embedded in the German region of  HYMNEN. Stockhausen never commented on the CD I sent him, but he was good enough to send me the latest catalog from his record label/publishing house at least...






     Eventually, in the early half of the 2010s I was developing my skills as a music writer, which led to the creation of this site, easily the largest and most ambitious undertaking in my “music analysis” career.

     On a final note, I can heartily recommend that if you really want to get to know Stockhausen’s music, then write your own articles on his works. I tried to make each of my articles/guides as comprehensive as they could be (over 1,000 printed pages in total), but Stockhausen’s works are timeless and multi-faceted, and someone else could create an equally deep overview from a completely different angle - in fact, I’m sure I won’t have to wait long for such a project to arise…

KONTAKTE - Electronic Music Techniques

(© www.karlheinzstockhausen.org)
No.12: KONTAKTE (Contacts)
for 4-channel tape
1958-60 (35:30)

also:
No.12 1/2 (ie 12.2) - KONTAKTE for tape, piano and percussion
No.12 2/3 (ie 12.3) - ORIGINALE (Originals), Musical Theatre with KONTAKTE (1961)  [90 min]

Part 3:

The first 2 parts of this analysis of KONTAKTE can be found in

Pulses and Sine Waves
     The basic sounds of KONTAKTE were mostly generated by a pulse generator which could create bursts of noise ("white noise clicks") at the rate of 16 clicks/second to 1 every 16 seconds, and with durations between 1/10000 of a second and 1-second. These "full-spectrum" noise impulses were then fed through a frequency bandwidth filter in order to produce pitches, noises and mixtures of both.  Other devices employed include reverb units and ring modulators.

Hardware
  1. Pulse wave generator
  2. Level-control amplifier
  3. Amplifier
  4. 12 different filters
  5. Reverberation unitEMT.140No 108
  6. Ring modulator
  7. Sine-Square-wave generators
  8. Low-tone generator
  9. Difference-tone ‘hummer’
  10. Four-channel variablespeed tape recorder
  11. 3 other three-speed tape-recorders connected to a patch board
  12. 3 Terz-filters (band pass)
  13. Hand-operated rotation table to be used with four microphones (up to 6 rotations per second)

Tape Loops
     The first phase of creating KONTAKTE was to create bits of tape loops with "source material" with which to work from.  These tape loops were then manipulated and processed in various ways.

     One of the ideas Stockhausen explored is that when periodic impulses are looped at high speed, they create stable tones (pitched drones).  However, by varying the placement of an impulse on a tape loop, a noise can be created, with the bandwidth related to the length of variation between the impulse placements and the proportion of irregular to regular rhythms.  A transition from a pure tone to a noise can be done by gradually varying the amount of regular periodicity in the tape loop.

Creating Structure X
  1. Record 60 secs of pulses with pitch zigzagging upwards.
  2. Speed up 10x to 6 secs (zigzag melody becomes rising tone color) .
  3. Record 30 seconds with pulses in decreasing speed (zigzag down) with pitch falling and then rising in a smooth curve.
  4. Record 45 seconds with pulses continuing to evenly slow down with pitch falling in a zig zag and then holding steady.
  5. Record 45 seconds with pulses continuing to evenly slow down.  7 pulses play a melody in the middle and then hold again, slightly lower.
  6. Final pulses have gradually altered "filter feedback time" so that the timbre becomes metallic.
  7. Combine result of 1-2 with slightly sped up result of 3-6.
  8.  Afterwards, the sound is filtered higher and higher.
     Interestingly, the final pulse frequency (160 Hz), generated through frequency filtering, is about the same at the beginning's 1st pulses (166 Hz), generated by the pulse generator. 

Score
Score notations (from Jonathan Harvey's book)

The Realization score of KONTAKTE (cover at top of page) is basically in 4 parts:
  1. Pictures and descriptions of the studio equipment.
  2. Descriptions of the creation of 16 categories of tape loops.
  3. Descriptions of the mixing/manipulation phase for each of the 16 Structures.
  4. Visual transcription ("score") of the resulting electronic music.
     In contrast to every other article on this site, for KONTAKTE I've decided to refrain from charting out a beat-by-beat, impulse-by-impulse "listening guide".  Every time I hear KONTAKTE, the experience always feels like a "first time". For this reason I think I'll leave the "mystery" intact. In any case, the Stockhausen Edition has track breaks for each Structure, so one can easily follow the proceedings with an eye on "moment-structure" if one wants.

Live Performance
Structure XIIIB/C, from KONTAKTE w Perc & Piano
( © Universal Edition/© www.karlheinzstockhausen.org)
     KONTAKTE for tape, piano and percussion is the most commonly presented live version of KONTAKTE, as it has a very accessible visual element. The live instrumental parts were originally conceived as improvised accompaniment to the electronic tape (which is precisely what HYMNEN mit SOLISTEN is) but Stockhausen's initial auditions with this concept didn't produce the interactions he was looking for. He soon realized that he had to fully notate an accompaniment to the tape part. Thus, the score to KONTAKTE for tape, piano and percussion is one part graphic score (top staff) and two parts notated music (lower section). Stockhausen's compositional strategy for the piano and percussion elements could probably be best gleaned from the transcript below:

     "The instruments point at certain events in the electronic music, underline... It’s like having a painting with special coloring, and certain forms and figures are underlined with (this) color...they play along with what’s happening, sometimes even "multiply" - like at the beginning, the first two minutes, they really multiply what’s already happening in the electronic music."

 -  Stockholm Q & A transcript

      To get an idea of what Stockhausen is going for here, see the directives for the musicians in HYMNEN mit SOLISTEN.


ORIGINALE
     This piece is essentially a performance art theatrical work, involving many surrealistic characters and plot elements, many of them pretty funny. Part of the proceedings is a live performance of KONTAKTE with piano and percussion. This staging of KONTAKTE functions as a "performance within a performance". For video and more, check out the page on Ubuweb.

Sound Impressions
(see INTRODUCTION, or "I Remember KONTAKTE...")

Links
Sound samples, tracks listings and CD ordering
KONTAKTE Scores
ORIGINALE Score
Four Criteria of Electronic Music (Stockhausen on Music)
The Concept of Unity in Electronic Music (Stockhausen, PoNM 1)
Wikipedia Entry
Works of Karlheinz Stockhausen (Robin Maconie)
Electronic Music of Karlheinz Stockhausen (Heikinheimo)
Compositional techniques in the music of Stockhausen (1951-1970) (John Kelsall PDF)
Kontakte by Karlheinz Stockhausen in Four Channels (Kevin Austin)
On Stockhausen’s Kontakte (1959-60) for tape, piano and percussion (John Rea PDF)
"Zur Entstehungs- und Problemgeschichte der Kontakte von Karlheinz Stockhausen." (On the Origin and Problem of "Kontakte", Helmut Kirchmayer, in German, included with original Wergo LP)
Stockhausen Introduction for “KONTAKTE”, Stockholm, 12th May 2001
Stockhausen Q & A after KONTAKTE, Stockholm, 12th May 2001
Revisiting Kontakte (Talea Ensemble)
Relationships of Isomorphic Elements in Stockhausen's Kontakte (Stephen Lucas) 
The Music of Stockhausen (Jonathan Harvey)
WDR Electronic Music Studio Tour (photos of electronic gear, 2015)
WDR Studios Vintage Pictures & Video Tour (120 Years of Electronic Music)

DONNERSTAG AUS LICHT: Basel 2016

Detail of Basler Münster (Basel Cathedral)
Introduction
     On June 25th, 2016, a new production of Stockhausen's first opera, DONNERSTAG AUS LICHT (Thursday from Light) premiered at the Basel Theatre in Switzerland, with stage direction by the American-born, Europe-based Lydia Steier (with sets designed by Barbara Ehnes, costumes by Ursula Kudrna, and video effects by Chris Kondek).  This opera, the first in Stockhausen's LICHT opera cycle, originally premiered at La Scala, Milan in 1981, and was last staged in 1985 at Covent Garden in London.  For this third production, the opera received a fairly dramatic "makeover" in it's scenic design, setting, choreography and costuming.

     The original score for DONNERSTAG includes very detailed instructions for many elements of the stage production, and this kind of control is a hallmark of Stockhausen's compositional oeuvre, almost from the start of his career.  In this way, he manages to coordinate (or "harmonize") the music with the visual presentation of his works.  Stockhausen's designs for DONNERSTAG are detailed in this site's entries below:

Original Synopsis
     In short, the first Act, Scene 1, KINDHEIT, describes the youth of the main character MICHAEL as he is torn between the conflicting emotional and intellectual desires of his mother EVA and his father LUCIMON (this scene notably features many elements which reflect Stockhausen's own childhood).  Scene 2, MONDEVA, describes MICHAEL's encounter with a musical space creature named MONDEVA (Moon-Eve), and their attempts to communicate and learn from each other through melody.  In a tandem setting, Michael's mother and father are killed by euthanasia and war, respectively.  Scene 3 is an examination setting where MICHAEL explains his past experiences to a panel of four judges in order to "graduate" to his next state.

     In Act 2, MICHAEL pops in and out of different regions of a giant globe of the Earth, in effect "traveling" through 7 global regions and portraying MICHAEL's experience as a human being on Earth. Near the 7th Station, MICHAEL hears the basset horn call of EVA, an incarnation of MONDEVA, who he'd met in the 1st Act.  MICHAEL leaves the globe to pursue EVA, as a pair of mischievous wind players appear (but which are soon reprimanded and "crucified" by somber brass).  At the end, MICHAEL reappears with EVE and they play intertwining melodies as they "ascend" together.

     In the 3rd Act, MICHAEL has returned to a heavenly plane where he is welcomes by yet another incarnation of EVA.  The first part of the Act, FESTIVAL, presents highly ritualized sequences involving lighted gifts and images and other heavenly phenomena.  At one point a small globe-shaped gift opens to expel a devil-like incarnation of LUCIFER, and the MICHAEL-dancer is forced to battle this disruptive force.  After the devil has been defeated, yet another incarnation of LUCIFER appears at a balcony box and taunts MICHAEL and EVA.  In Scene 2, VISION, MICHAEL (still in his 3 incarnations of tenor, trumpet and dancer-mime) explains LUCIFER's origins in a musical-choreographic soliloquy.  He then explains why he took on a human form and experienced the pain and joy of growing as a human. Seven visions ("shadowplays") are projected on a screen which act as "time-windows" into his Earthly existence and subsequent return to the Heavens.  He ends DONNERSTAG AUS LICHT by proclaiming his love for Mankind.

     Overall, this opera has a premise which begins on a relatively mundane and localized premise (family/education), moves to a global setting (a semi-symbolic journey around the Earth), and then ends in a "cosmic" homecoming, with a few somewhat slapstick-ey moments thrown in to keep things from becoming too overly pompous (MICHAEL defeats the dragon-devil with the help of the orchestra conductor's baton stick, for example).

The Basel 2016 Production
DONNERSTAGs GRUSS in the Basel Theater's lobby stage, featuring a 70's lounge band playing Stockhausen music.
 (photo © Motoko Shimizu)
     The 2016 Steier production essentially revamps/remixes most of the elements of the opera except for the musical score itself.  In other words, everything that was not anchored with a treble or bass clef symbol was deemed open to revision.  Steier's team apparently felt that Stockhausen's original stage premise would need major alterations in order to make the opera more palatable to "contemporary audiences", and thus gave the visual narrative a much more cynical, self-parodying flavor, reducing much of the cosmic symbolism in the original staging to a more traditional opera narrative with a decidedly more "Earthly" through-line.

     The story begins the same, with Michael's dysfunctional childhood, but the euthanasia of Michael's mother becomes a more pivotal flash-point which is revisited in each of the subsequent Acts.  The stress of Michael's childhood causes him to have an apparent mental breakdown, during which he has an Oedipal fantasy (the father repeatedly shoots down auditioning Eve's in various states of moral undress, much to Michael's chagrin).  In the second Act, after admittance to a mental hospital, Michael travels not around the world, but only within the confines of the patient rec-room, and has video-projected hallucinations (partially induced through chemical means) about imaginary adventures in various global locales, .

     The third Act finds a grown-up Michael (as a Christ-like, Stockhausen-circa-1977 figure) becoming a kind of enlightened "guru" in a celestial church, and administering to a somewhat insouciant choir of "space children" acolytes.  Additionally, the dragon-devil figure which Michael fights in FESTIVAL takes on the post-modern costuming of a drag-queen, and in the end Michael becomes disillusioned with the dogmatic restrictions of his own church.  The final Vision scene features a 5-way soliloquy between the 5 incarnations of Michael characters from all 3 Acts, but with a curtailed selection of "mime-plays" concentrating on his relationship with his mother.

     A more detailed comparison between Stockhausen's original staging instructions and the Steier team's alterations follows (photos © Sandra Then, click to enlarge).

Act/Scene Original score setting Basel 2016 Staging
DONNERSTAGs GRUSS
(Thursday Greeting)
     Classical musicians perform in an opera house foyer-salon in traditional performance dress.      A somewhat lackadaisical cabaret band of smoking and drinking 70's-era beatniks perform as a lounge act.
Act 1: MICHAELs JUGEND (Michael's Youth)
Scene 1: KINDHEIT (Childhood)      Scene 1, KINDHEIT, describes the youth of the main character MICHAEL as he is torn between the conflicting emotional and intellectual desires of his mother EVA and his father LUCIMON (this scene notably features many elements which reflect Stockhausen's own childhood). 
     Scene 1 plays out relatively traditionally with Michael's attentions being baited by the mother and father, each at cross-purposes.  A central glass enclosure however includes the addition of dancers with giant mannequin heads miming a private family birthday party (one of the presents is a toy robot, which will make a reappearance in the 3rd Act).  The father-son hunting trip is arrived at with Michael riding on his father's back, instead of on a bicycle.  A video screen later shows the rather graphic skinning of a rabbit, as the mother is presented on a blood-soaked bed, having just miscarried (the original score features a short-lived infant brother).  In the original score, a dancer, LUCEVA, appears and the father flirts with her, but here the dancer appears only in the pantomimed birthday enclosure scene.
Scene 2: MONDEVA (Moon-Eve)
Original MONDEVA costume.
www.karlheinzstockhausen.org)
     MONDEVA describes MICHAEL's encounter with a musical space creature named MONDEVA (Mooneve), and their attempts to communicate and learn from each other through melody.  In tandem settings, Michael's mother and father are killed by euthanasia and war, respectively.
     The original score prescribes a simultaneous triptych of scenes between the 3 characters, but here the father and son's scenes are melded together into an Oedipal, Busby Berkeley-inspired fever-dream where a rotating succession of Moon-Eves are shot and killed by the father (these female images are drawn from the various women's magazines read by the Mother in the first scene).  Eventually the dream features a distant Eve's cry, which distracts the father long enough for Michael to shoot his father dead, after which Michael's interplay with Moon Eve continues normally.
Scene 3:
EXAM
     Scene 3 is an examination setting where MICHAEL explains his past experiences to 4 judges in order to "graduate" to his next state.
     Instead of a university thesis examination, here Michael is apparently strapped to a psychiatric bed and is tested by doctors with chemical and shock treatments.  The academic jury is here replaced by white-coated doctors with plastic noses.  At the end, Michael is deemed fit for what will soon be revealed as an insane asylum.
Act 2
MICHAELs REISE UM DIE ERDE
(Michael's Journey Round the Earth)
www.karlheinzstockhausen.org)
     In Act 2, MICHAEL pops in and out of different regions of a World's Fair-proportioned Earth globe, in effect "travelling" through 7 ethnic regions and portraying MICHAEL's experience as a human being on Earth. Near the 7th Station, MICHAEL hears the basset horn call of EVA, an incarnation of MONDEVA, who he'd met in the 1st Act.  MICHAEL leaves the globe to pursue EVA, as a pair of mischievous wind players appear (but which are soon reprimanded and "crucified" by somber brass).  At the end, MICHAEL reappears with EVE and they play intertwining melodies as they "ascend" together.









     Here, Michael journeys only within the confines of an insane asylum, populated with zombie-like mental patients being "treated" with cold water baths and other uncomfortable-looking therapies.  A seated audience of patients watches a film projection featuring images from around the 7 world stations (intended as a "soothing" video-therapy), as the overhead stage video screen simultaneously displays Michael and his dance and trumpet incarnations travelling "Monty Python-style" through dreamlike impressions of the 7 ethnic landing spots (Africa features graphic footage of lions killing and eating a deer, and Japan features an animated Godzilla from which Michael and his reflections are forced to flee).

     In the original staging of the scene, the Michael- trumpeter has a "consoling" duet with the contrabass, but here that aspect is visually ignored and only heard.  Instead, Michael acts as a "sane" person trapped inside an insane asylum (ie - "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest"), and comforts a patient who resembles his mother.  In the finale of the Act, a Christ/Stockhausen-like figure (complete with a white, chest-baring shirt) appears, bathed in light.
Act 3: MICHAELs HEIMKEHR (Michael's Homecoming)
Scene 1: FESTIVAL
Covent Garden, 1985
(© www.karlheinzstockhausen.org)
     MICHAEL has returned to a heavenly plane where he is welcomes by yet another incarnation of EVA. FESTIVAL presents highly-ritualized sequences involving lighted gifts and other heavenly phenomena.  At one point, a small globe-shaped gift opens to expel a devil-like incarnation of LUCIFER, and the MICHAEL-dancer (as a toreador) is forced to battle this disruptive force when it changes into a dragon.  After the devil has been defeated, yet another incarnation of LUCIFER appears from the balcony and taunts MICHAEL and EVA.
www.karlheinzstockhausen.org)




     Foil-wrapped "acolytes" are seated on bleachers, as the Stockhausen/Michael/Christ figure ministers to a line of supplicants.  The old woman appears with the re-emergence of the toy robot from the first Act's birthday party.  Additionally a stack of video monitors arranged in the figure of a robot (inspired by Nam June Paik's work) is wheeled onto the stage, featuring a soundless, kaleidoscopic collage of Stockhausen's zoomed-in eyes and face, speaking (extracted fragments from archival interview footage).

     Instead of a drag(on)-devil appearing out of a globe, a drag-queen in gothic "Lolita" garb appears out of a giant birthday cake (again hearkening back to the first Act).  The Michael dancer (in a schoolboy uniform) battles the drag-devil.  Eventually the "real" Lucifer appears, not from the balcony or a crane, but as a ghost-like video-apparition from within the glass enclosure.
Scene 2:
VISION
     MICHAEL (still in his 3 incarnations of tenor, trumpet and dancer-mime) explains LUCIFER's origins in a musical-choreographic soliloquy.  He then explains why he took on a human form and experienced the pain and joy of growing as a human. 7 visions ("shadowplays") are projected on a screen which act as "time-windows" into his Earthly existence and subsequent return to the Heavens.  He ends THURSDAY FROM LIGHT by proclaiming his love for Mankind.      Michael climbs over the choir bleachers to end up in a starkly-lit space in order to give his final solo.  He is accompanied by the Michael trumpet and the other previous incarnations of Michael.  The video projects the moving lips of Michael (though sadly not synchronized to the live voice).  The reminiscences of Michael's previous episodes are recited, but the flashback "shadow-plays" are limited mostly to the disturbing fate of Michael's mother (death by gas, instead of injection) as the grown-up Michael struggles to save her through the glass walls.
DONNERSTAGs ABCHIED (Farewell)      The staging of DONNERSTAGs ABCHIED (Farewell) proceeds in the traditional manner, with 5 trumpeters performing from rooftops surrounding the exit of the opera house.

Final curtain call Basel 2016.
(photo © Motoko Shimizu)
Impressions
     This production of DONNERSTAG AUS LICHT obviously takes dramatic (no pun intended) liberties with Stockhausen's original score instructions.  For this reason, it might be worth considering this production to be a kind of "remix" or maybe more specifically a "collage", with Steier's premise to be one collage element, and Stockhausen's musical notes and rhythms as the other.  The first scene is more or less "faithful" (or at least within the realm of traditionally-accepted production changes),  but from the second scene on the degree of divergence increases to the point that in some scenes the libretto text (which, like the music, remains mostly intact) seems to be accompanying a completely unrelated stage action or image.  For example, the Moon-Eve scene has a text which is basically a flirtatious seduction, but the stage action features the execution of several prospective Eves without any consequence at all in the text - Michael just keeps on talking to the next Eve as if it were the same one as the previous one.  This strange juxtaposition of contrasting text and image has the effect of producing something like the dadaistic/impenetrably bizarre theater of George Foreman (for example).  However, if one follows the stage narrative without paying too much attention to the libretto, it actually ends up having a form of internal logic and consistency (I think).

     In any case, I was totally engaged and enthralled by the entire 6 hour experience, as the performances from the musicians and dancers were top-notch and at a level of which I'm sure Stockhausen himself would have enthusiastically applauded (the staging would probably have left him apoplectic).  However it often felt a bit like having the rug pulled out from under my feet due to the amount of divergence from Stockhausen's original staging instructions.  Certainly many in the "Stockhausen circle" have felt dismay at the amount of redressing done to Stockhausen's work, and Stockhausen himself frowned upon "remixes" of his work.  I personally wish that a version of DONNERSTAG AUS LICHT with Stockhausen's original premise were available as a film so that an "integral" version could be experienced by a greater audience.  Steier's vision is an interesting experiment and recommended viewing (as long as one accepts that it is a Stockhausen-Steier collaboration), but I also strongly believe that a "faithful" staging would survive a contemporary audience if done right.

     Lydia Steier's production of Stockhausen's DONNERSTAG AUS LICHT is presented at the Basel Theatre three more times in 2016: September 29, October 1 and 2, during the end of the GALAXIE STOCKHAUSEN, a Stockhausen mini-festival from Sept. 26 to Oct. 2.
Listening to DONNERSTAGs ABSCHIED performed from 5 rooftops outside of the Basel Theater,
with Elisabethenkirche in the background.
(photo © Motoko Shimizu)
Links
DONNERSTAG AUS LICHT at Theater Basel Page
Program (PDF, includes a revealing interview with the Basel production team in German)
English Libretto (PDF)
Trailer 
Lydia Steier Page

Reviews
Rolf Kyburz Review (English)
Ben Harper Review (English)
"Oppressive Intense Psychodrama" BR Klassik (German)
NMZ.de (German)
SWR.de (German)
NZZ Welt (German)
der-neue-merker.eu (German)
"Devil from a Cake": Stuttgarter Nachrichten (German)
"Engel für Charly": van.atavist.com (German)
"Kürtener's Astonishment at a Radical Staging": Bergische Landeszeitung (German)
Die Deutsche Bühne (German)
OMM (Online Musik Magazin) (German)
ResMusica (French)